Tuesday, November 7
8:00 am - 8:55 am

Breakfast Breakout Round Table Discussions

Concurrent breakout discussion groups are interactive, guided discussions hosted by a facilitator to discuss some of the key issues presented earlier in the day’s sessions. Delegates will join a Table of interest and become an active part of the discussion at hand. To get the most out of this interactive session and format please come prepared to share examples from your work, vet some ideas with your peers, be a part of group interrogation and problem solving, and, most importantly, participate in active idea sharing.

Table 1: Deep Learning and High-Throughput Imaging

Moderator: Berton Earnshaw, Ph.D., Director, Data Science Research, Recursion Pharmaceuticals

Table 2: Using Microphysiological Systems in Preclinical Drug Development

Moderator: Michael L. Shuler, Ph.D., Samuel B. Eckert Professor, and J. & M. McCormick Chair, Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University; Director of Cornell’s Nanobiotechnology Center

  • How authentic do the systems need to be to be useful?
  • Could an all human microphysiological system replace animals in preclinical studies in the next 10 years?
  • Could microphysiological models be used to predict drug-drug interactions?

Table 3: Artificial Intelligence and the Pathologist

Moderator: Peter Antinozzi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Molecular Medicine), Department of Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Center of Diabetes Research, Center on Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Wake Forest University School of Medicine

  • What is the likelihood of raw computing power and AI algorithms to emulate (replace) a pathologist's interpretation of diagnostic images?
  • What are the primary technical challenges?
  • What are the regulatory and societal barriers?

Table 4: Bioprinting 3D Structures

Moderator: Min Jae Song, Research Fellow, National Eye Institute, National Institute of Health

Table 5: Comparison of Cell Phenotypes across Different Cell Types or Instrumentation

Moderator: Robert F. Murphy, Ph.D., Ray and Stephanie Lane Professor of Computational Biology and Professor of Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Machine Learning; Head, Computational Biology Department, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

  • Have you encountered a need to compare the specific phenotypes observed in one assay or screen with phenotypes from another screen performed using different equipment?
  • What approaches would work for this task?
  • How about comparing phenotypes across different cell types, either when images were taken with the same or different instruments?

Wednesday, November 8
7:30 am - 8:25 am

Breakfast Breakout Round Table Discussions

Concurrent breakout discussion groups are interactive, guided discussions hosted by a facilitator to discuss some of the key issues presented earlier in the day’s sessions. Delegates will join a Table of interest and become an active part of the discussion at hand. To get the most out of this interactive session and format please come prepared to share examples from your work, vet some ideas with your peers, be a part of group interrogation and problem solving, and, most importantly, participate in active idea sharing.

Table 1: The Art of Choosing Appropriate 3D Cell Culture Models

Moderator: Sophie A. Lelièvre, D.V.M., Ph.D., LL.M. (public health), Professor, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine; Associate Director, Collaborative Science, Purdue University Center for Cancer Research; Scientific Director, 3D Cell Culture Core (3D3C) Facility, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Discovery Park; Coleader, International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN); Professor of Cancer Pharmacology, West Lafayette-IU Medical School

  • When are organs-on-a-chip better suited than standard 3D cell cultures to address a biological question?
  • What is the importance of the cell model and of the culture medium for 3D culture compared to classical (2D) cell culture?
  • Is there a real advantage of using 3D bioprinting to design and build 3D culture models?

Table 2: Mimicking Tumor Immunosuppression in a Dish - Use of Cell Culture Models for Immuno-oncology

Moderator: Jakub Swiercz, Head of In Vitro Pharmacology & Screening, iTeos Therapeutics SA

  • What are current challenges to overcome?
  • Can one model mimic multiple immunosuppression mechanisms
  • 2D vs 3D models for compound screening in IO

Table 3: Multi-Organ Organ-on-a-Chip Models

Moderator: James J. Hickman, Ph.D., Professor, Nanoscience Technology, Chemistry, Biomolecular Science, and Electrical Engineering, University of Central Florida

Table 4: Toxicity Screening in 3D Models

Moderator: Matt Wagoner, Associate Director, Mechanistic and Investigative Toxicology, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

  • The devil’s in the details | Quantitative considerations for toxicity screening
  • The Valley-dation of Death | Building a bridge between academic innovation and the high-confidence assays needed by industry

Table 5: Screening Complex Biological Models

Moderator: Andreas Vogt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute

  • Are complexity and heterogeneity obstacles or opportunities? Should we abandon a good model just because it is difficult to analyze and standardize? What influences that decision?
  • How much assay development is needed? How much is enough?
  • Are canonical measures of assay performance appropriate for complex systems? What are the alternatives?